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Landscaping Cleanup after Storm Damage in New Jersey

The last couple of years have been rough when it comes to residential storm damage in New Jersey.

The last couple of years have been rough when it comes to residential storm damage in New Jersey.  Between the hurricanes, nor’easters and even a tornado, homeowners have spent less time thinking about their landscapes and more time thinking about their property cleanup. So in honor of silver linings everywhere, we’re suggesting a two birds, one stone approach to turning your home maintenance into a chance to do some landscaping cleanup.

If you have a yard that suffered minor or major storm damage in New Jersey, consider this your chance to redesign the outdoor space for your dreams.

  • Time for a new look up. Instead of mourning the loss of towering oak trees, consider the benefits of willows.  They’re less likely to suffer storm damage in New Jersey winds because they’re flexible. And willows get a lot taller than you might expect. They’re perfect hideaways for reading a book or taking a rest in the shade.
  • Time for a new look down.  A lot of post-storm property cleanup deals with the debris of ripped up plants or fallen hardscapes.  Depending on the materials you use, you may be able to recycle them into something new.  Perhaps your pavers could be turned into a small decorative wall around new flowerbed.
  • Consider changing the theme. It’ll be spring before you know it!  Instead of worrying about landscaping cleanup for the flora you had, think about a new look with new colors.  You can patch holes from fallen trees with round flowerbeds filled with exotic or native shrubs, or even install a water feature, like a small fountain.

 

Property Cleanup Can Lead To New Landscaping Ideas

If you’re looking for ideas for landscaping in Monmouth County, NJ, try tuning into a garden channel on TV, or looking up your nearby towns on Google Earth for ideas.   You may find inspiration in the strangest places.  But you can also help out your community in a surprising number of ways.

  1. Buy local. Homeowners aren’t the only ones who suffer with storm damage in New Jersey.  Your local businesses do, too. By using local landscaping companies in Monmouth, NJ to create new designs, you’re giving business owners a hand.
  2. Go native. New Jersey is the Garden State, right? We have some of the most gorgeous plants, some of the most lush lawns, and some of the most breath-taking wildlife in the country.  Your landscaping cleanup could lead to finding new, native species of flowers and trees that you didn’t even know existed.
  3. Think ahead. The most important thing about property cleanup is learning what will hold — and what will not. Some landscapes are simply better equipped to handle flood-prone spaces and high winds.  A licensed landscape architect could help you be creating designs that are not only beautiful, but sturdy as well.
  4. Be sustainable. By using local plants and shrubs, you’re keeping the earth in balance.  Exotic plants are pretty, but they’re not always great for the area.  Planting native plants can keep the environment in balance.

We know that property cleanup isn’t easy, especially after a big storm. But if you think of it as landscaping cleanup instead, it might feel a little less stressful.  And who knows?  You might find some neat ideas while you work alongside your neighbors, restoring your neighborhood one flower at a time.

This post is contributed by a community member. The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Patch Media Corporation. Everyone is welcome to submit a post to Patch. If you'd like to post a blog, go here to get started.

Dan Kelleher January 02, 2013 at 08:49 PM
If you have any landscape questions I would be more than happy to help you, please visit https://www.facebook.com/Mylandscapeadvisor to contact me.

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